Paleo Root Beer Gelatin Float

Did you know that gelatin can do wonders for your digestive tract? It has also been shown to improve skin, hair, nails, stretch marks, cellulite and wrinkles. In addition, it reduces inflammation, improves immune function and much much more! Gelatin is a nutrition powerhouse! Learn more about it in THE GELATIN SECRET. .

 

Paleo Root Beer Gelatin Float

Gelatin is a great way to get some of the healing benefits of bone broth into our diets during these warm summer months. I love this creative recipe for Paleo Root Beer Gelatin Float from Grass Fed Girl‘s new eBook, Easy Paleo Gelatin Recipes. Caitlin Week’s entire book is great.

Easy Paleo Gelatin Recipes offers recipes for 30 smoothies, gummies and puddings. She is currently offering it for an introductory price of $5.99! Such a steal. Click here to download.

Ipad-gelatin-screen-shot-451x700

Click here to download Easy Paleo Gelatin Treats for only $5.99 today!

If you aren’t familiar with the healing properties of gelatin, here is a quick run down. We aren’t talking about that toxin loaded, jello from when we were kids. These recipes use nourishing gelatin from grass-few cows – the kind that is so soothing to our digestive systems.

Healing properties of gelatin:
  • Supports skin, hair and nail health
  • Calms the body and balances cortisol levels
  • Strengthen bones, teeth, and cartilage
  • Supports muscle formation
  • Healing to the digestive tract
  • It’s full of collagen, which helps reduce wrinkles and cellulite
  • Beneficial for the joints
  • Reduces inflammation
  • Improves immune function
  • Can assist with hormone balance and weight regulation
Grass-fed Gelatin

Great Lakes is the only brand of gelatin that I have come across that is made from grass-fed cows. Although, it is not labeled on the packaging, you can confirm it here on their FAQ page. I’ve also confirmed this with them via e-mail. They offer two types of gelatin from cows. One gels and the other doesn’t. The one that doesn’t gel is great for using in smoothies, tea or water. It has no flavor. I order mine from Amazon.

Click here to order nourishing grass-fed gelatin!

great lakes gelatin

Paleo Root Beer Gelatin Float

Ingredients
2⁄3 cup water, divided
2 tbsp gelatin, divided (find grass-fed gelatin here)
1 – 12 oz can natural root beer OR natural
sugar free Zevia root beer
1 cup coconut milk (full fat, canned) (find BPA-free coconut milk with no additives here)
1⁄2 tsp stevia powder extract OR 1 tbsp honey
1⁄2 tsp vanilla extract (find organic, gluten-free vanilla here)

  1. Mix half the water with half the gelatin in a saucepan over medium heat for 3-5 minutes.
  2. Add the root beer to the pan and stir.
  3. Pour the root beer mixture into 2 mason jars or glasses.
  4. Refrigerate the root beer mixture for one hour.
  5. Heat up a saucepan over medium heat and stir in the remaining water and gelatin.
  6. Add the coconut milk, sweetener and vanilla to the pan and stir for 5 minutes.
  7. Pour the coconut milk mixture over the root beer and refrigerate for one more hour.
  8. Serve and enjoy.

Grass Fed Girl Tip: Make sure to use a natural organic root beer that is free of high fructose corn syrup. Caramel color can also be added to commercial sodas that can have artificial flavors as well as gluten. Read labels carefully to find an organic soda that uses natural ingredients that are not genetically modified. Zevia soda is available at Whole Foods and works as a low carb option in this recipe.

 

Click here to download Easy Paleo Gelatin Treats and access 30 recipes for Paleo gummies, smoothies and puddings!

 Root Beer Float watermark.001

 

 


PAID ENDORSEMENT DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. I only recommend products that I wholeheartedly believe to be valuable or that I use myself.

Comments

  1. Emilie says

    Hey, just to clarify (maybe I missed it somewhere in your post) – does this recipe use the gelatin that gels? Thanks!

  2. Nicole says

    a straw? Is it drinkable- or eaten with a spoon? I’m slightly confused as to the finished consistency